Special coverage in the Trump Era

Full interview with The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer about her new article, "The Reclusive Hedge-Fund Tycoon Behind the Trump Presidency: How Robert Mercer Exploited America’s Populist Insurgency." March 29, 2017, Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! Special Broadcast from the Women's March on Washington

The Economics of Happiness -- new version

Local Futures is now offering a free, shortened version of its award-winning documentary film The Economics of Happiness. This 19-minute abridged version brings us voices of hope of in a time of crisis. www.localfutures.org.

In memory of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - it's time to ban nuclear weapons
A message from ICAN on August 6, 2016:

At 8:15 on August 6, 1945 the city of Hiroshima was destroyed with an atomic bomb. In a few minutes thousands of people lost their lives in the attack. Three days later the city of Nagasaki met the same fate.

ICAN has produced this video in memory of the victims of these nuclear attacks on two cities. In the coming months, governments will decide if negotiations of a treaty banning nuclear weapons should start or not. ICAN believes that the majority of the states in the world are ready to support a resolution at the UN General Assembly to start negotiations of a new treaty banning nuclear weapons.




What's New?

February 03, 2017

"It may only take 3.5% of the population to topple a dictator – with civil resistance"

"Historical studies suggest that it takes 3.5% of a population engaged in sustained nonviolent resistance to topple brutal dictatorships. If that can be true in Chile under Gen Pinochet and Serbia under Milosevic, a few million Americans could prevent their elected government from adopting inhumane, unfair, destructive or oppressive policies – should such drastic measures ever be needed."

It may only take 3.5% of the population to topple a dictator – with civil resistance

The Guardian, Feb. 1, 2017
By Erica Chenoweth

"Many people across the United States are despondent about the new president – and the threat to democracy his rise could represent. But they shouldn’t be. At no time in recorded history have people been more equipped to effectively resist injustice using civil resistance.

Today, those seeking knowledge about the theory and practice of civil resistance can find a wealth of information at their fingertips. In virtually any language, one can find training manuals, strategy-building tools, facilitation guides and documentation about successes and mistakes of past nonviolent campaigns.

Material is available in many formats, including graphic novels, e-classes, films and documentaries, scholarly books, novels, websites, research monographs, research inventories, and children’s books. And of course, the world is full of experienced activists with wisdom to share.

The United States has its own rich history – past and present – of effective uses of nonviolent resistance. The technique established alternative institutions like economic cooperatives, alternative courts and an underground constitutional convention in the American colonies resulting in the declaration of independence. In 20th century, strategic nonviolent resistance has won voting rights for women and for African Americans living in the Jim Crow south.

Nonviolent resistance has empowered the labor movement, closed down or cancelled dozens of nuclear plants, protected farm workers from abuse in California, motivated the recognition of Aids patients as worthy of access to life-saving treatment, protected free speech, put climate reform on the agenda, given reprieve to Dreamers, raised awareness about economic inequality, changed the conversation about systemic racism and black lives and stalled construction of an oil pipeline on indigenous lands in Standing Rock." ...
Read full article here

 

Erica Chenoweth is a professor & associate dean for research at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver. She is the co-author of Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict.


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