Special coverage in the Trump Era

Full interview with The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer about her new article, "The Reclusive Hedge-Fund Tycoon Behind the Trump Presidency: How Robert Mercer Exploited America’s Populist Insurgency." March 29, 2017, Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! Special Broadcast from the Women's March on Washington

The Economics of Happiness -- new version

Local Futures is now offering a free, shortened version of its award-winning documentary film The Economics of Happiness. This 19-minute abridged version brings us voices of hope of in a time of crisis. www.localfutures.org.

In memory of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - it's time to ban nuclear weapons
A message from ICAN on August 6, 2016:

At 8:15 on August 6, 1945 the city of Hiroshima was destroyed with an atomic bomb. In a few minutes thousands of people lost their lives in the attack. Three days later the city of Nagasaki met the same fate.

ICAN has produced this video in memory of the victims of these nuclear attacks on two cities. In the coming months, governments will decide if negotiations of a treaty banning nuclear weapons should start or not. ICAN believes that the majority of the states in the world are ready to support a resolution at the UN General Assembly to start negotiations of a new treaty banning nuclear weapons.




What's New?

April 19, 2017

"The prospect of war on the Korean peninsula is simply inconceivable."

Christine Ahn, of Women Cross DMZ, a global movement of women mobilizing for peace in Korea, explains why.

War Is Not An Option for Korea

Attacking North Korea now would undermine the very reason U.S. troops have been stationed on the peninsula for seven decades: to protect the South Korean people

From Women Cross DMZ

By Christine Ahn, www.fpif.org
April 18th, 2017 reposted by popular democracy.org

"Let me be very clear: The policy of strategic patience has ended,” U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters at a news conference in Seoul, South Korea. “All options are on the table,” Tillerson continued, including “an appropriate response” to any North Korean threat.

The United States and North Korea are like two “accelerating trains coming toward each other,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi warned last week. North Korea test-fired four ballistic missiles off the coast of Japan as thousands of South Korean, Japanese, and U.S. troops, backed by warships and warplanes, are currently engaging in massive military exercises, including the deployment of the Navy SEALS that killed Osama Bin Laden.

With no communication other than military posturing, Pyongyang is left to interpret Washington’s maneuvers as preparation for a pre-emptive strike. Given the political vacuum in South Korea following President Park Geun-hye’s impeachment, all tracks are heading towards one destination: war.

At a Council of Foreign Relations discussion on March 13, Mary Beth Long, a former assistant secretary of defense, advocated for “aggressive movement” given the failure of the Obama administration’s strategic patience, which depended heavily on sanctions to further isolate and foment the collapse of the Kim Jong Un regime.

Yet as hawks call upon President Trump to deal with North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs through the use of force, they’re undermining the very reason the U.S. military has allegedly been stationed on the Korean peninsula for seven decades: to protect the South Korean people.

Although the fantasy of surgical strikes to topple brutal dictators has long intoxicated American military officials, they’ve been restrained by the sobering reality of such reckless action. In the 1990s, when President Bill Clinton considered a first strike on North Korea’s Yongbyon nuclear reactor, the Pentagon concluded that even limited action would claim a million lives in the first 24 hours — and this was well before Pyongyang possessed nuclear weapons." ...
read full article here


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