Special coverage in the Trump Era

Full interview with The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer about her new article, "The Reclusive Hedge-Fund Tycoon Behind the Trump Presidency: How Robert Mercer Exploited America’s Populist Insurgency." March 29, 2017, Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! Special Broadcast from the Women's March on Washington

The Economics of Happiness -- new version

Local Futures is now offering a free, shortened version of its award-winning documentary film The Economics of Happiness. This 19-minute abridged version brings us voices of hope of in a time of crisis. www.localfutures.org.

In memory of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - it's time to ban nuclear weapons
A message from ICAN on August 6, 2016:

At 8:15 on August 6, 1945 the city of Hiroshima was destroyed with an atomic bomb. In a few minutes thousands of people lost their lives in the attack. Three days later the city of Nagasaki met the same fate.

ICAN has produced this video in memory of the victims of these nuclear attacks on two cities. In the coming months, governments will decide if negotiations of a treaty banning nuclear weapons should start or not. ICAN believes that the majority of the states in the world are ready to support a resolution at the UN General Assembly to start negotiations of a new treaty banning nuclear weapons.




What's New?

May 18, 2007

New Study Links Common Chemicals to Breast Cancer

A study published this week revealed that more than 200 common chemicals, found in everyday products, can cause breast cancer in laboratory animals. Rachel's Democracy and Health News asks: "Isn't it time to take precautionary action and minimize exposures to these chemicals except when absolutely necessary? Don't we know enough to act?"

On May 14, 2007 Los Angeles Times Staff Writer Marla Cone wrote:
"More than 200 chemicals -- many found in urban air and everyday consumer products -- cause breast cancer in animal tests, according to a compilation of scientific reports published today (3 pg pdf download-ed).

Writing in a publication of the American Cancer Society, researchers concluded that reducing exposure to the compounds could prevent many women from developing the disease.

The research team from five institutions analyzed a growing body of evidence linking environmental contaminants to breast cancer, the leading killer of U.S. women in their late 30s to early 50s.

Experts say that family history and genes are responsible for a small percentage of breast cancer cases but that environmental or lifestyle factors such as diet are probably involved in the vast majority..."

Read full story reprinted by Rachel's Democracy and Health News.


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